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Day 286:Being the “Normal” Child(ren) Isn’t Easy Either

photoAnybody who has read much of my blog probably knows I’m disabled. What you may not know, depending on which posts you’ve read, is that I have a non disabled sister who is two years younger than me.. When a family has a child with special needs it is easy for able bodied children to feel lost.My sister learned to pick me up at age six.   She also started asking to push my chair on flat surfaces at around this time, even though she was barely tall ll enough to see over the handles. I remember her fixing me cereal and toast for breakfast before school after Mom got me up and left  for morning PT.  Able kids often find themselves in the role of advocate for their disabled siblings amongst their own peers and sometimes with adults.I’ve lost count how many times  Morgan has gotten mad at someone’s unfair treatment of me and told them off, no matter how old the person is. She continues to be one of  my loudest cheerleaders even when I  don’t think there is anything worth cheering for. I am forever grateful for her support and love  If I could give one piece of advice to parents who suddenly find their children divided  by that invisible yet obvious line between “normal” and “different” remember a few things.  You have (at least) two kids. Even though may see half a dozen people  related to their medical issues in any given week or month,, make time for their sibling .  Your individual relationships with them will shape their relationship  with each other. Do your best to make sure  that an able child doesn’t feel like their primary function  st home is that   of caregiver for their disabled sibling, a situation like that will  probably blow up in your face loudly if it goes on for very long.

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