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Day 338: Back to School IEPS, Advice From Someone Who Had Them

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Note: The information in this post pertains to US public schools. Many other countries may have similar procedures but I am not familiar with them.  None of what stated here should be viewed as professional opinion of any  kind. It’s been a bit since I was in public school and I am in no way shape or form a lawyer so if you suspect your child’s school isn’t toeing the federal line, seek advice from a lawyer who specializes in the Americans with Disabilities Act.

Individual Education Plans, if you are the parent of a school-age special needs child you get familiar with these real quick. For those parents of special needs kids whose kid is just starting school,it’s basically a   chance for you to get together with your child’s teachers, representatives of the school board and any specialists who see your child during the school year. These specialists can include but are not limited to, an Occupational Therapist,Physical Therapist, and Speech  Therapist. If it is your child’s first IEP  it will probably just be your child’s teachers, the  principal, and the Special Education Coordinator for your county. The coordinator can, and should, be able to set up assessments with many specialists whose help can your child’s learning environment .

Here are some things about the IEP process you may not know. The first and, in my opinion, most important, thing to know  is that your child has the right to be present at any and all of their IEP’s. I started attending mine in second grade and continued   all the way through high school. You as the parent may not think it’s a good idea depending on your child’s disability and level of understanding but you should know that the school can’t refuse your child’s presence, even if it means they have to leave class early.

Your child has the right to add things to the document while in the meeting. My fourth-grade teacher had a wonderful idea to assign me an in class helper from my classmates who helped with everything except lunch. going to the bathroom, and pushing my wheelchair while outside. I still had my individual adult aide for the stuff the kids couldn’t help with and it helped me feel more normal.For reasons I still don’t understand  the lady who became my aide in the fifth grade totally refused to cooperate if the idea was continued. It didn’t dawn on me until last month  that I could  have called for a revision to my IEP and had it added and then she would have been forced to comply, like it or not.

An IEP is a legal document which everyone who attends the meeting must sign before the meeting can end.  IF anyone tries to tell you don’t have to sign or ” they’ve taken care of it” call them on their bullshit because that’s what is.(The county coordinator tried to pull that on us once, we were not amused)

Your child has to sign  if they are there but if they can’t you can sign their name and put signed  by with your name and parent or guardian in parentheses beside it.

One final thing I’d like to say is that even though it is always up  to you the parent whether or not to include your kid as an active part of their IEP process. I strongly you to do so if they are not developmentally challenged.They will have to be their own advocates one day, they might as well start learning self advocacy when your there to back their play.

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